NuttyTart

Mageirocophilia

Blackcurrant and Chocolate Mousse Cake

Black Currant and Chocolate Mousse CakeI have been meaning to make this cake for years now, and thanks to the We Should Cocoa challenge, by Choclette and Chele of Chocolate Teapot and the Chocolate Log Blog, I finally got around to it! It’s a homemade version of the blackcurrant & chocolate mousse cake by Kakkugalleria, which not only tastes divine but is also gorgeous to look at, in all its geometric glory. This recipe is a tweaked combination of a few I found online: the main inspirations came from Kotiliesi and Pirkka magazines. I omitted the glaze this time as I didn’t have currant juice, but it would certainly make the cake even neater and prettier. It’s a long recipe and a bit fiddly, but very much worth all the fiddling!


Blackcurrant and Chocolate Mousse Cake

8-12 pieces


Cake:
2 eggs
75 ml caster sugar
2 tablespoons cocoa powder
50 ml corn starch
1/4 teaspoon baking powder


Chocolate mousse:
150 g dark chocolate (I used one with 70% cocoa solids)
200 ml heavy cream
3 tablespoons powdered sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla sugar
3 tablespoons hot water
3 gelatine leaves, plus water for soaking


Blackcurrant Mousse:
200 g blackcurrants
100 g cream cheese
200 ml heavy cream
100 ml powdered sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla sugar
3 tablespoons blackcurrant liqueur
3 gelatine leaves, plus water for soaking


Glaze:
3 gelatine leaves, plus water for soaking
300 ml sweetened, diluted blackcurrant juice


To make cake:
Preheat oven to 200 C. Line the bottom of a 24 cm springform pan with a round piece of parchment paper. Lightly butter the paper and the sides of the pan (no need to go all the way up!).
Whisk eggs and sugar until light and thick. Sift together cocoa powder, corn starch and baking powder and fold into the egg & sugar mixture.
Pour batter into the prepared pan and bake for 10 minutes.
Allow to cool. Turn the cake out and give the pan a quick wash. Line the bottom and the sides of the pan with parchment paper and put the cake back into the pan. (I pressed it down a little as the sides of the cake had pulled away from the pan as it cooled)


Tip: If you want a perfectly smooth cake base with neat sides, double the cake recipe and bake it in a jelly roll pan (225 C for 5-7 minutes). Allow to cool and cut out a 24 cm circle to fit the springform pan. Eat the rest of the cake. :-)


To make chocolate mousse:
Melt the chocolate on top of a double boiler and allow to cool.
Whip heavy cream until stiff peaks form. Add powdered sugar and vanilla sugar; mix. Add melted chocolate and mix well.
Soak gelatine leaves in plenty of water for 5 minutes. Squeeze out the gelatine leaves and dissolve in the hot water. Gradually add to the chocolate cream mixture, pouring in a thin stream and whisking continuously.
Pour chocolate cream mixture over the cake base. Transfer pan into fridge and let set for at least 2 hours.


To make blackcurrant mousse:
Place blackcurrants in a saucepan and simmer over moderate heat until the berries have softened (5 minutes or so). Push the softened berries through a sieve; combine the resulting smooth berry paste and the cream cheese.
Whip heavy cream until stiff peaks form. Add powdered sugar and vanilla sugar; mix. Combine whipped cream and cream cheese mixtures.
Soak gelatine leaves in a plenty of water for 5 minutes. Heat the blackcurrant liqueur. Squeeze out gelatine leaves and dissolve in the hot liqueur. Gradually add to the currant cream mixture, pouring in a thin stream and whisking continuously.
Pour over the chocolate mousse layer. Cover pan with clingfilm, transfer into fridge and let set overnight.


To make glaze:
Soak gelatine leaves in plenty of water for 5 minutes. Heat blackcurrant juice.

Squeeze out the leaves and dissolve in the hot juice. Allow to cool and pour mixture over the cake.

Transfer into fridge and let set for at least 3 hours.


Decorate with berries and serve to an adoring crowd.

 

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Category: Culinary witter
  • Choclette says:

    My goodness me, this mousse cake looks absolutely stunning and is a very welcome entry to WSC. I have so little patience, I’d feel I’d pulled of a real masterpiece if I produced anything that looked as good as this. It sounds delicious too of course. Thanks for playing along with WSC and I’m glad it prompted you into making this wonder.

    29/07/2012 at 13:03
    • nuttytart says:

      Hi Choclette! Thanks for the fun challenge! :-)

      06/08/2012 at 18:11
  • Janine says:

    This cake is gorgeous! The colour imparted by the blackcurrants is gorgeous. I’m definitely bookmarking this one!

    30/07/2012 at 00:54
    • nuttytart says:

      It is a very pretty cake! One day I’ll try and make that smooth, square version… ;-)

      06/08/2012 at 18:12
  • underthebluegumtree says:

    Oh my. That is absolutely stunning. And sounds gorgeous to boot. Am pinning this to my recipes to try board pronto.

    31/07/2012 at 18:28
    • nuttytart says:

      Thanks!! Am now following you on Pinterest! ;-)

      06/08/2012 at 19:32
  • Rachel says:

    Wow! This looks absolutely gorgeous! I really love that your mousse uses no raw eggs – I recently tried a recipe for a mousse cake using raw eggs and was really worried about food poisoning so I would love to try your recipe:)

    01/08/2012 at 13:12
    • nuttytart says:

      I’m actually a bit wary of gelatin, myself – will have to try and see if agar would work in this recipe! Let me know how the cake turns out. :-)

      06/08/2012 at 19:38
  • Apelynn says:

    Hi there!
    I tried this recipe and it all went well, until I had to pour the blackcurrant liqueur with gelatin into the whipped cream -blend. Suddenly it got all curdled and grainy, horrible! Where did I go wrong? I didn’t want to wait for the liqueur to cool down too much, since I thought that the gelatin would stiffen up. Should I wait until it’s cooled and how cool? Thanks a lot! =)

    20/07/2013 at 00:33
    • nuttytart says:

      Oh no, sorry to hear that! Gelatin is a bit fiddly: too hot and curdling can happen, to cool and there’s no more pouring it. I let it cool a little while so that the bowl is just warm to the touch, and then pour it into the cream in a very thin stream, stirring all the time, so that the mixture is tempered at the same time. I’ll update the recipe instructions – I see now that they are a bit vague here!

      20/07/2013 at 11:11

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